Site of Carthage

Carthage Museum: (00216) 01 34 10 77
Who has not heard of Hannibal and this city who dared brave the might of Rome? Now the ruins of both these great empires lay open to the sun and wildflowers. Declared a national monument the...

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Carthage Museum: (00216) 01 34 10 77
Who has not heard of Hannibal and this city who dared brave the might of Rome? Now the ruins of both these great empires lay open to the sun and wildflowers. Declared a national monument the town of Carthage and nearby Salammbo abound in vestiges of the Punic and Roman empires, baths, dwellings, temples, shrines and the fabulous naval port of the Carthaginians.

The hill of Byrsa, where in the 8th century BC, Carthage was founded by the legendary Princess Elissa-Dido, is a storehouse of history .Newly restored, the former cathedral of Saint Louis, which crowns the hill is now a cultural centre and the nearby national museum of Carthage holds an impressive collection of Punic statues, steles and urns. How strange that this breathtakingly beautiful site should have been the theatre of such violence, as a Roman historian wrote of the fall of Carthage "the city was then razed and burnt to the ground and the accursed land covered with salt to ensure its barrenness."

For a thousand years, Phoenicians were masters of the Mediterranean and over 200 war ships and innumerable merchant vessels were sheltered in the nearby port of Salammbo. At its center the Admirals Island still exists and archaeologists are reconstituting the pavilion with its shrine and docks. Next to the ports the ancient sanctuary of the goddess Tanit (Tophet) a quiet, shady square of hundreds of funeral steles.

The Romans returned to Carthage and built on its ruins a new Carthage resplendent with great buildings, theatres, villas and baths. Carthage became the administrative capital for Africa and its importance can be seen in the Antoinine Thermal baths, one of the largest built under the Roman empire with the "cool room" an amazing 47 meters long and 15 meters high. The Roman theatre is still used today for the summer festival of Carthage.

Magnificent ruins of ancient Carthage

Dougga (Thugga)

Dougga is all that one dreams a Roman site should be. Grandiose temples and theatres, forum and markets stand in remarkable repair on a mountainside overlooking wheat fields and valley. Imposing Dougga spreads over 65 hectares,...

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Dougga is all that one dreams a Roman site should be. Grandiose temples and theatres, forum and markets stand in remarkable repair on a mountainside overlooking wheat fields and valley. Imposing Dougga spreads over 65 hectares, its position on the slopes forced Roman builders to renounce their standard city plan and adapt their monuments to the terrain.

Dougga was originally a fortified Berber village (the name Thugga meant "pastures"). Later, it served as the seat of the Numidian king Masinissa in the 2nd century BC. The Romans occupied the city in the late 2nd century BC.

The impressive Roman ruins of Dougga were designated a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1997. Dougga is widely recogniesd as one of the most beautiful Roman sites in Tunisia. At its height between 20 to 30,000 people would have lived here and their shops, stores and baths, latrines, wash room and gymnasiums are still evident, bringing the ruins to life. Stone streets bear the grooves of chariot wheels and in the silent, windswept afternoon one can almost hear their clatter. Dougga was a prosperous city even before the coming of the Romans.

 

Kairouan

An hour drive from Sousse, discover Kairouan "the city of 50 mosques”. The spiritual home of all Tunisians, the city itself rises like a dream of ochre and tawny beige, serene in its 13 centuries of Islamic culture, authentic a...

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An hour drive from Sousse, discover Kairouan "the city of 50 mosques”. The spiritual home of all Tunisians, the city itself rises like a dream of ochre and tawny beige, serene in its 13 centuries of Islamic culture, authentic and proud of the wondrous beauty of its mosques, the symphony of its columns and arches, the exquisite delicacy of the stone work. The towering and sober dignity of the Great Mosque seems to embody the spirituality that has inspired artists and poets from its creation until the present day.


History

Dating from the 9th century its austere beauty dominates the entire city. Inside, visitors can wonder at the exquisite elegance of the wood carved doors and stucco arabesques, as well as the forest of columns (400) of the prayer room with their Phoenician, Roman and Arabic capitals.

The medina, with its imposing walls and monumental gates encloses lovely mosques, an ancient well and hundreds of shops where world famous Kairouan carpets of pure wool are woven and sold and where the visitor can admire the handicrafts of artisans in copper, leather, and in the traditional Jebba and burnous, ornate and richly adorned or elegantly natural. The artisanal centre provides an excellent exhibit on carpets and carpet weaving and visitors who may be thinking of buying a carpet are welcome to consult the Tunisian National Handicrafts Organization or Artisanat, as it is familiarly called, for advice on quality, prices, styles, care and shipping their carpet home.


Carpets

As Kairouan is the oldest and most renowned carpet centre in Tunisia, the selection is enormous .Undoubtedly the hand knotted pile carpet reigns supreme with the typical design of Kairouan, Alloucha, being of natural wool colours with a large border of parallel stripes of geometric patterns and a central lozenge with a floral design. However, the creativity and artistry of the weavers embroiders this basic scheme with an infinite variety of patterns and colours creating a masterpiece of harmony and elegance.

Carpets are graded by their fineness ,the number of knots in a square meter ,with a normal weave from 10,000 to 40,000, fine weave from 65,000-90,000 and extra fine from 160,000 - 500,000. Silk carpets may be over 500,000 knots per square meter.

Kairouan also produces a woven carpet - the margoum, using mainly geometric Berber designs, lighter in weight and in a multitude of colours.

Tunisian craftsmen have explored, with outstanding success, a blending of traditional Tunisian patterns with modern designs creating a new line of knotted carpets to satisfy more modern tastes.

Justly proud of the excellence of its carpets Tunisia has established a strict quality control and only those that satisfy the high standards are given the coveted label with the seal of the Tunisian Republic and information on the date, size, fineness, of the carpet. It is your guarantee of excellence. Unless you are an experienced carpet buyer, or have purchased an antique carpet, best rely on this label of quality.

Kairouan is also noted for its brass work, intricately designed trays, vases and bowels, embossed or engraved as well as leatherwork ranging from camel saddles to fine slippers.

Bulla Regia

Bulla Regia is a remarkable site, home to underground villas and priceless mosaics. The villas were part-constructed underground to keep the inhabitants cool during the heat of the summer months.

Located in Northern Tunisia, Bu...

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Bulla Regia is a remarkable site, home to underground villas and priceless mosaics. The villas were part-constructed underground to keep the inhabitants cool during the heat of the summer months.

Located in Northern Tunisia, Bulla Regia shows evidence in a very different way to Dougga of Roman presence in this agricultural region. At first sight Bulla Regia may disapoint, no great temples, arches or monuments mark the site, but don't drive on!

Approaching the ruins, one is suddenly aware that part of the houses and baths are below your feet. In order to remain comfortable in the summer heat, houses were built with a winter apartment on ground floor and summer quarters underground with hollow air - pipes built into the walls. Light was provided by windows in the top floor and unlike sober Matmata, rich mosaics graced the floors. Unique testimony to the genius of the builders of the Coliseum and the aqueducts! Nearby is a small but interesting little museum.


History

The city of Bulla was first mentioned by Latin classical sources when the pursuing Roman armies caught up with the Numidian king Hiarbas at Bulla where he had sought refuge (in 81 BC). It also appeared, much  later, (end of 4th century AD) in one of Saint Augustine’s sermons when he reproached  the inhabitants of  the city for continuing to go to such places of debauch as the theatre.

While their neighbours, the inhabitants of Chemtou, had long ago deserted them. In the writings of Arab travellers, Bulla Regia is referred to as Henchir bul. Archaeology and in particular Latin inscriptions are much more generous in terms of information supplied. They enable us to trace the history of the city since the 4th century BC until the Moslem conquest in the seventh century AD.

To see the image stream for Bulla Regia on Flickr click here (opens new window)

Thuburbo Majus

Unlike most Roman cities, Thuburbo Majus lacks the straight streets, the rectangular outlay. A common theory is that when the Romans started to build it in 27 BCE as a veteran's colony, an existing Punic town was already here, ...

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Unlike most Roman cities, Thuburbo Majus lacks the straight streets, the rectangular outlay. A common theory is that when the Romans started to build it in 27 BCE as a veteran's colony, an existing Punic town was already here, and it was not sacrificed for the new developments. This town is in the dip between the Forum and the House of Neptune, although every stone here have been relocated many times during the Roman centuries.

National Museum of Carthage

The National Museum at Carthage is beside the Cathedral of St. Louis, on Byrsa Hill and holds a collection of Punic and Roman treasures, jewellery, household items, weapons, deathmasks, a marble sarcophagi as well as a model of...

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The National Museum at Carthage is beside the Cathedral of St. Louis, on Byrsa Hill and holds a collection of Punic and Roman treasures, jewellery, household items, weapons, deathmasks, a marble sarcophagi as well as a model of Punic Carthage. There is a beautiful view from outside the museum over Carthage, the Punic harbour, Tunis and the distant Bou Kournine mountain.

The museum provides a comprehensive historical outlook before you can explore the various archeological sites -  he Amphitheatre, Tophet sanctuary, Antonine Baths and Punic ports - which will help you envisage life in the third largest city in the Roman Empire.

Place de l’UNESCO, Boîte postale 3, 2016 Carthage, Tunisie.

(00216) 71 730 036

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